Feeling Presidential?

Why not have students read and write Presidential Farewell Addresses…

Begin with George Washington:
Some quotes:
On education:
“Promote then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.”

On trying his best yet making many mistakes:

“Though, in reviewing the incidents of my administration, I am unconscious of intentional error, I am nevertheless too sensible of my defects not to think it probable that I may have committed many errors. Whatever they may be, I fervently beseech the Almighty to avert or mitigate the evils to which they may tend. I shall also carry with me the hope that my country will never cease to view them with indulgence; and that, after forty five years of my life dedicated to its service with an upright zeal, the faults of incompetent abilities will be consigned to oblivion, as myself must soon be to the mansions of rest.

On returning to be a public citizen:

“Relying on its kindness in this as in other things, and actuated by that fervent love towards it, which is so natural to a man who views in it the native soil of himself and his progenitors for several generations, I anticipate with pleasing expectation that retreat in which I promise myself to realize, without alloy, the sweet enjoyment of partaking, in the midst of my fellow-citizens, the benign influence of good laws under a free government, the ever-favorite object of my heart, and the happy reward, as I trust, of our mutual cares, labors, and dangers.”

Dwight D. Eisenhower, 1961, Military-Industrial Complex Speech:

On disarmament:

“Down the long lane of the history yet to be written America knows that this world of ours, ever growing smaller, must avoid becoming a community of dreadful fear and hate, and be instead, a proud confederation of mutual trust and respect.

Such a confederation must be one of equals. The weakest must come to the conference table with the same confidence as do we, protected as we are by our moral, economic, and military strength. That table, though scarred by many past frustrations, cannot be abandoned for the certain agony of the battlefield.

Disarmament, with mutual honor and confidence, is a continuing imperative. Together we must learn how to compose differences, not with arms, but with intellect and decent purpose. Because this need is so sharp and apparent I confess that I lay down my official responsibilities in this field with a definite sense of disappointment. As one who has witnessed the horror and the lingering sadness of war — as one who knows that another war could utterly destroy this civilization which has been so slowly and painfully built over thousands of years — I wish I could say tonight that a lasting peace is in sight.

Happily, I can say that war has been avoided. Steady progress toward our ultimate goal has been made. But, so much remains to be done. As a private citizen, I shall never cease to do what little I can to help the world advance along that road.”

President Obama, 2008

On achieving forming a more perfect union:

“It’s the conviction that we are all created equal, endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights, among them life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.It’s the insistence that these rights, while self-evident, have never been self-executing; that We, the People, through the instrument of our democracy, can form a more perfect union.This is the great gift our Founders gave us. The freedom to chase our individual dreams through our sweat, toil, and imagination — and the imperative to strive together as well, to achieve a greater good.”

There are many options to choose from. These are a select few options.
As an activity I would have students write their own farewell address. What would they say to our country today?

This will tie in nicely to your own Farewell Address at the end of year in June!

Feel Fantastic in February

When my students return from Presidents Week/ Winter break they will be SHOCKED! I decided to spruce up my classroom with more than just some new teaching material. The groundhog said spring is almost here so I have to be prepared (and so should YOU!)

  1. I added a  reed diffuser. Scents have a way of triggering memories. I do NOT want my classroom to smell like “teen spirit” anymore! These are my favorites:
    Lavender Scented Diffuser

    Fun Cactus Diffuser

    Ocean Scented
  2.  Bright Answer Buzzers instead of having students raise their hands!
  3. Brighter Clothes for me!

    Lilly Pulitzer Maxi Dress

    Long Sleeved Lilly Dress
  4. This great cell phone valet so students can be more focused and less worried about their buzzing phones during class!
  5. This bright balance ball chair so students can take a break when they are done with an assignment
  6. Fun Emoji Erasers to match my  Google Classroom Emoji Header!

    Google Classroom Animated Themes (Fun Pack #7)

    Feel Fantastic in February with these tips!

Continue reading “Feel Fantastic in February”

Fluttering for February!

Here are some tips for a unforgettable February in the classroom!

  1. Change up your Google Classroom header on a weekly basis with our February bundle!
    Feb
    hearts
    catandmousestreak
    Apples
  2. February Pop Up Valentines are much better option than a Pop Quiz!
  3. Historical Speed Networking. Have two historical figures gain a chance at love in the millennium.

Keep the momentum going and have fun in February!

Nine reasons to switch to group tests in 2019!

grouptest.png

I have been experimenting with group tests this year and the experience has been overwhelmingly positive.    So,  I am giving you my top nine reasons for making the switch from individual to group tests!

  1. Test day becomes a day of learning.  No more quiet desperation on test day.   Now, test day is the most active, engaged day on the schedule.    Students will work hard if their peers are depending on them.    Many groups actually have fun on test day!
  2. A lesson in social capital.  I work with older students and they are quick to identify and challenge non-contributors.    I find that groups are mostly kind to students who struggle with the test material, and brutally honest with those who choose not to work.
  3. Tests can be more challenging.    Group tests always need one or two hard questions that stimulate discussion.
  4. Reduced need for anti-cheating strategies (as in 6 versions of the same test).
  5. Reduced Anxiety.  Do you have those students who immediately have their hand in the air as soon as you hand them a test?  With a group test, students get assurance from their classmates.
  6. More authentic.  Most workplaces encourage employees to cooperate and seek help with problems.  Shouldn’t schools give it a try?
  7. Late comers and test-day skippers will get on board. Missing test day means going it alone.  Most students only make that mistake once.
  8. Less to grade.  Who doesn’t want fewer papers to grade?
  9. Nerds rule. That awkward, nerdy kid is now the most popular kid in the class!

Continue reading “Nine reasons to switch to group tests in 2019!”